Get the Word Out!

The 21st annual Ride to Work Day is set to take place on June 18th, 2012. The Ride to Work Organization encourages riders to commute on their motorcycles and scooters to demonstrate:

“The number of motorcyclists to the general public and to politicians.

That motorcyclists are from all occupations and all walks of life.

That motorcyclists can reduce traffic and parking congestion in large cities.

That motorcycles are for transportation as well as recreation.

That motorcycling is a social good.” (www.ridetowork.org)

Cities are being encouraged to support this yearly event- some of which even go as far to offer free parkig on city owned parking structures and ramps. With increased fuel economy, fewer emissions than a car, and the ability to take in more scenery around you, we have to ask… why aren’t there more riders taking their bikes out for the morning commute?

Consider these surprising (or maybe not so surprising) statistics compiled by the Ride to Work Organization.

“Out of a total 129,141,982 commuters in this country (USA, 2003) 147,703 of them ride motorcycles to work regularly. That’s only .11 percent.” (US Census Bureau)

“Tests comparing car and motorcycle performance on real journeys suggest that traveling by motorcycle can shorten journey times by as much as 33 minutes of every hour for town centre and city travel, and 20 minutes of every hour for travel through a mixture of built-up and non built-up areas.” (Motorcycle Industry Association UK)

“Total fuel consumption:

Motorcycles 191 million gallons (50.1 avg mpg x 1,800 miles per year per motorcycle)

Passenger Cars 74,590 million gallons (22.3 avg mpg x 13,000 miles per year per car)

Light Truck/SUV 56,302 million gallons (17.7 avg mpg x 13,000 miles per year per Lt Trk / SUV)”

(US Dept of Transportation, Bureau of Travel Statistics)

“If every work day were Ride to Work Day, 60,000 gallons saved x 250 work days = 15,000,000 less gallons used per year.” (Ridetowork.org)

What a difference a day can make! Have you considered using your bike for the daily commute? Advocates have even begun answering back to those who think it’s not possible to commute daily on a bike. Concerns dealing with safety all the way to keeping work clothing clean during the ride are discussed often on online forums. Those in favor of the switch encourage new riders to participate in advanced riding classes and networking with those already commuting daily for pointers.

Let us know what you think and if you’re planning on participating in Ride to Work Day this year!